10 Steps You Can Take to Fight for Inclusive Freedom Today

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Freedom Center Voices
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10 Steps You Can Take to Fight for Inclusive Freedom Today

In the wake of the death of George Floyd, many across the country are looking for ways to get involved. We at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center believe in equity and justice, and encourage everyone to take action in the fight for inclusive freedom. There are many ways to do this, but here are 10 recommendations:

1. Fight against racism and bias by understanding the biases you possess.

We are all influenced by implicit bias—zero in on your own blind spots by taking the Implicit Association Test. Find it here: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html

2. Learn about the complicated history of racism in America.

A great place to start is this list: A History of Race and Racism in America, in 24 Chapters, created by the National Book Award-winning-author and professor Ibram X. Kendi. Kendi compiled this list for The New York Times Book Review, highlighting influential works about the black experience for each decade of the nation’s existence including the poems of Phillis Wheatley and Toni Morrison’s Pulitzer-winning novel Beloved.

3. Combat racial inequality by supporting Black-Owned businesses in your city, state, or online.

In fact, if you are looking to buy some books to help you gain knowledge, check out this list of 12 Black-Owned Bookstores You Can Support Right Now.

4. Not a reader? Watch documentaries, tv shows and films to learn more about racial injustices.

Here is a great list: 11 Shows and Documentaries to Help You Learn About Racial Justice and Police Brutality.

5. Learn how to become an ‘Upstander,’ with the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center.

An upstander is a person who speaks or acts in support of an individual or cause, particularly someone who intervenes on behalf of a person being attacked or bullied. We can all be upstanders if we use our unique talents and characteristics in positive ways. In this time of crisis, take the museum’s VIA Character Strengths survey to determine what your top character strengths are and how you can leverage them to address challenges and make a difference. CLICK HERE to take the survey.

6. If you are able, protest.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center supports the right to protest, as it has historically proven to be the best means of communication for oppressed people. Read our full statement here.

7. Are podcasts your preferred way to absorb information? Listen to a podcast dedicated to discussing issues of racism and inequality.

Check out this list of 24 Podcasts That Confront Racism in America.

8. Sign petitions demanding change for racial violence.

For example, find the change.org petition Justice for Breonna Taylor here.

9. Urge your city, state and/or county officials to adopt recommendations for policing equity and accountability by writing letters and calling your local offices.

If you live in Cincinnati, here is a list of recommendations put together by the Cincinnati Black United Front and the Ohio Justice and Policy Center: http://www.ohiojpc.org/protests-pandemic-recommendations-equitable-cincinnati/

10. If you are able, donate to organizations fighting against social injustice on the front lines.

Here is a list of organizations from around the country: https://blavity.com/heres-a-list-of-black-organizations-you-can-donate-to-for-bailouts-and-other-protest-efforts?category1=news.

And finally, whatever you choose to do in this difficult time—do so with empathy and passion.

Special thanks to the Nancy & David Wolf Holocaust & Humanity Center and the Ohio Justice and Policy Center for their contributions to this post.

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