Voices

The Power of StoryCorps

This spring, I was approached by my friend and colleague Nancy Yerian and asked if I would be interested in participating in a StoryCorps interview at their mobile recording booth. She was able to make the appointment through Vibrant Kin, one of many community partners who help make sure the StoryCorps mobile tour reaches a diverse audience. I was excited to be asked and immediately decided that I would like for her to be my partner in the conversation. We are both members of the LGBTQ+ community and I thought it would be a great opportunity for each of us to tell our own stories and contribute to LGBTQ+ oral histories, which are unfortunately few and far between in the collections of museums and libraries. While I cannot speak for Nancy directly, I feel we both felt a sense of responsibility heading into the interview on behalf of our community.

The day finally came for us to meet in the recording booth. I found myself strangely nervous. I didn’t know what to expect and the thought of our conversation being recorded with a member of the StoryCorps team in the room became a somewhat daunting prospect. I was prepared to speak honestly and openly with Nancy about whatever she wanted to ask. Knowing that we would both be sharing our coming out stories and deeply personal details about our lives in front of another person became intimidating. I felt like I was about to come out of the closet again. I was, and this time I was, we were, coming out to the entire nation. 

Morgan was our StoryCorps team member and he helped us settle in. As we talked with him and did our sound tests I started to feel more at ease and I think Nancy did as well. I became excited now that we were getting this opportunity to tell America our stories; stories that need to be heard by many in our country. I hope that in doing so, we were able to make a positive difference in the life of someone who isn’t yet out to family, friends or their community.  Our stories, full of joy and pain and all that comes with declaring to the world that you are proudly and unapologetically who you are, may provide some kid in rural Indiana or elsewhere, hope that it gets better. I reached out to Nancy about this post and she provided this comment about the experience: “I am used to being the listener, not the storyteller, so this experience felt incredibly personal as well as empowering. The connection we were able to make in just forty minutes (which flew by) reminded me of how powerful our stories really are.”

Participating in StoryCorps was a deeply humbling and incredibly emotional experience. I will be processing our conversation for days going forward. Nancy and I have both resolved to continue our conversation in the coming weeks, both of us feeling we have only just begun to tell our stories. This is the power of the StoryCorps project. It connects all of us as humans and as Americans. I am so honored to have had the opportunity to participate and I encourage anyone to do so if they get the chance. We all have a story to share and we all have an obligation to listen. It’s how we learn to become a better people. We have more in common than we think, and there is less that divides us. We need to come together and listen. That is what StoryCorps is all about.

Jesse Kramer
Creative Director
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center