FotoFocus 2016: Robin Rhode: Three Films

ROBIN RHODE: THREE FILMS
OCTOBER 1, 2016 - JANUARY 23, 2017

South African, Berlin-based artist Robin Rhode engages a variety of visual languages—photography, performance, drawing, film—to construct lyrical narratives with social and political import and a good bit of poetry. Making use of everyday materials, such as soap, charcoal, chalk and paint, Rhode creates fantasy narratives, often with a Chaplin-esque character played by Rhode himself at the center of the drama. Coming of age in a newly post-apartheid South Africa, Rhode was exposed to many different forms of expression, namely, hip-hop, film, and popular sports, as well as the black community’s continued reliance on storytelling in the form of colorful murals. Rhode applies a hybrid street-based aesthetic to intervene in and transform urban landscapes into imaginary worlds.

Robin Rhode: Three Films features, in a continuous loop of approximately ten minutes, Rocks (2011), A Day in May (2013), and The Moon is Asleep (2016).

Born in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1976, Rhode graduated from the South Africa School of Film, Television and Dramatic Arts, Johannesburg, in 2000. Rhode has had several solo exhibitions, notably at the Hayward Gallery, London (2008); the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (2009); the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2010); the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2013).

Rhode’s film Open Court (2012) is also included in New Slideshow, a film exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Center (October 6–9, 2016).

About the Biennial
The FotoFocus Biennial is a regional, month-long celebration of photography and lens-based art held throughout Cincinnati and the surrounding region. Featuring over 60 participating museums, galleries, academic institutions, and community organizations, the 2016 Biennial will include original FotoFocus curated exhibitions and four days of events and programming, including screenings, lectures, and performances.

The FotoFocus Biennial 2016 Theme: Photography, the Undocument